Broil King Keg Forum
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Author Topic: New Zealand newbie  (Read 13956 times)
Cresco750
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« on: February 28, 2016, 12:32:52 PM »

Hi everyone. I've been wanting to buy a kamado style bbq for a couple of years, ever since a friend of mine bought a BGE. Unfortunately, here in NZ the prices of kamado's are rediculous; here we would pay the equivalent of around USD$1300 for a BKK 5000, and USD$1600 for a complete large BEG. I've just bought a new/old stock BSK from an importers warehouse clear out for a really good price, and now I'm doing a heap of reading over the old forum posts to learn how to use it since it's my first charcoal bbq.
I've just finished sealing up the top and bottom vents, and will be tapping the lower vent tracks tight once the sealant has dried, followed by seasoning and burn off. Tomorrow will be my first cook.

I'd be keen to hear from any other NZ keg owners out there, and hopefull get a few tips on cooking some of our local produce?

Cheers----Neil
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Yanknrebel
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« Reply #1 on: February 29, 2016, 08:49:19 PM »

Welcome!  Don't know if we have any other NZ folks here. Post up your cooks and enjoy your Keg!
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Cresco750
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« Reply #2 on: February 29, 2016, 11:37:03 PM »

Thanks heaps! I just finished my first cook this evening; I opted to play it safe with a nice steak and baked spuds. Luckily it won my wife's seal of approval!

Cheers
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bripep
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Re:
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2016, 02:35:39 AM »

We are out there. BSK owners in N.Z. that is!. You are right about the prices here, I got mine through a frind who basically got it for me at cost. On reflection it is so versitile I would now pay full retail - 3 for 1 really, Grilling, Smoking and of course where it really excells Low and slow. This forum was a great help getting started with recipes that work. Amazingribs.com has also helped me take my BBQing to a higher level.  Just be prepared to explain yourself when your friends and family want to know how you have cooked the best BBQ food they have ever tasted, I'm serious.

Sent from my SM-T800 using Tapatalk
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Cajunate
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« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2016, 06:51:05 AM »

Cool! You're going to love it!
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Cresco750
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« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2016, 01:48:43 AM »

Hey Bripep, Thanks for the link to Amazingribs. I've just had a quick look and there seems to be some really good stuff there.
Today I tried low and slow pork ribs. Although I'm yet to calibrate my temp gauge I seem to be able to get the keg to hold low temp ok (200-225F), but it is a bit of a sport :-). I left the ribs on for four hours but their internal temp was still down around 150F, and with the family getting hungry I was forced to throw the vents open and hurry things along. As a result they ended up being a little drier than I was expecting, so next time I'll wrap in foil.

This weekend I'm hoping to try a butterflied leg of lamb.

Cheers
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bripep
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Re:
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2016, 02:55:53 AM »

Ive been there!  Check amazingribs.com article on thermometers and you won't trust the one in the hood again. I use a gasmate digital thermometer with a remote  (up to 30m range - v handy in winter) and set the probe up next to the meat that way you know what the real cooking temperature is (and don't lift the lid it really sets you back). Once you know the real cooking temp you won't need to foil (I don't). To increase my thermal mass I use a diffuser with ceramic stones and sand in it (not water) on my low and slow cooks. If you are getting a thermometer for measuring air rather than meat temp make sure you can cancel the alarm that is activated when meat temp is reached (good to know what your meat temp is remotely as well).

Sent from my SM-T800 using Tapatalk
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