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Author Topic: Venison "Prime Rib" Roast  (Read 22525 times)
coleman1495
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« on: January 03, 2016, 06:46:47 PM »

First wild game recipe! Grin

This was a "Prime Rib" roast that I cooked up recently. It came from a young whitetail buck I found up in the bush.Prime rib was marked on the package from the butcher but I think standing rib might be more accurate.It had been sitting in the fridge for a couple of days before I cooked it. Also I believe it may have hung for a week or so at the butcher shop. Please note my photography skills and equipment are rather lacking. Something to note about venison is that it is extremely lean. Its hard to add too much fat to deer meat.The more fat you can get it to soak up the better. It is also very fickle and less forgiving that domestic meats.
Here is the roast beforehand:


I wrapped it up with 4 pieces of bacon and placed it in a cast iron pan with a couple of lumps of butter.Like I said before you cant add too much fat.Here it goes in the Keg. I had the keg at around 500F when I put it in. I immediately dampered it down to 2.5 on both the top and bottom vents. A handful of cherry smoking chips went into the coals.


Here she is cooked and on my plate. This is half of it. Took about 25 min. Please note that in my experience venison is best eaten on the rare side. It turns into leather very fast if you over do it. I tried using a thermometer to tell when it was done but it gave me a totally erroneous number. I actually had pulled it out early and had to through it back in. Thats another story.


Also i found the bullet in my portion.The Hornady SST bullet totally exploded in it.




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Shawn W
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« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2016, 01:13:46 AM »

First wild game recipe! Grin

This was a "Prime Rib" roast that I cooked up recently. It came from a young whitetail buck I found up in the bush.Prime rib was marked on the package from the butcher but I think standing rib might be more accurate.It had been sitting in the fridge for a couple of days before I cooked it...

Call it what you will I call it spectacular!  Smiley

About what temp did your keg run at?

'Standing' means ribs still attached but the 'prime' part is kind of confusing to be sure. Prime Rib roast currently means any roast ribs 6-12, bones attached and not to be confused with prime 'grade' beef. You can buy a choice, select or prime grade prime rib roast (AA, AAA or prime here in Canada). Ribs 10-12 are the small bone end and leaner with a larger centre muscle and ribs 6-9 are the large bone end fattier with more muscle segments and connective tissue. Take your pick or get the whole thing!  Smiley

To make things even more confusing some folks only refer to the small bone end as prime rib roast and the large bone end as standing rib roast, but regardless of number of ribs they get if they have the small bone end they will still call it a prime rib roast. Got it? Good, because I still find it confusing.  Grin

Bones off around here it's labelled rib-eye roast, I've read it's also called rolled rib roast.

Anyway, loved your pics too BTW, great job!
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coleman1495
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« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2016, 08:53:28 AM »

Wow I can see how the naming gets confusing. I would guess this was everything from the prime rib area. It seems as if deer does not have a standard naming system. The cuts on a cow don't necessarily translate well because of the size of the animal. A couple of beef cuts end up being one cut on a deer.

I shall call it rib-eye. I think that is what it was labelled as last year when it was made into steaks.

The roast went in at 500F ( or maybe slightly over around 525F) and ended up at ~450F by the time it was done. I have the other side to cook tonight so Ill pay closer attention this time.

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