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Author Topic: Broil King Keg Grilling Steel!  (Read 84448 times)
Yanknrebel
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« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2014, 10:04:29 AM »

I'm in for one!
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Shawn W
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« Reply #16 on: November 13, 2014, 01:48:20 AM »

I don't get why BK went with carbon steel for this. I'd go for a smooth CI or high grade SS first. CI for pure performance SS for rust resistance.
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Focuspuller
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« Reply #17 on: November 13, 2014, 02:32:35 AM »

I don't get why BK went with carbon steel for this. I'd go for a smooth CI or high grade SS first. CI for pure performance SS for rust resistance.

Found this:

A major difference between carbon steel and cast iron is that carbon steel is more ductile than cast iron, while cast iron is more brittle than carbon steel. It is this reason that carbon steel can be made much thinner than cast iron. Technically speaking you can make cast iron cookware thin, but they would be easy to crack. This difference simply is the root cause of other differences: cast iron cookware are made thicker and heavier (due to its brittleness), cast iron cookware have better heat capacity and more even heating surface (due to its being heavier and thicker).... On the flip side, carbon steel cookware are lighter and thinner, and are more responsive to heat.

Depending on the applications, one material may be better than the other. For a Dutch Oven, you will rarely need it to have a quick heat response, but heat retention may be important for you, so cast iron is good. For a wok which you want to toss and slip food, then a lighter and more ductile carbon steel one makes more sense -- you don't want to bang the wok and have it crack on you .
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BBQRich
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« Reply #18 on: November 13, 2014, 08:29:28 AM »

I'm going to take Larry's word on this one.  I know we tested different thicknesses of the carbon steel, and there was no drop off in performance between 1/4" and anything thicker.

Stainless would be wickedly expensive and much more difficult to handle for our supplier.  Tougher to cut, more discolouration from the heat and so forth.  Cast in a flat disc would be a challenge to not develop inconsistencies as it cools, I think.

All fair points Shawn, thanks for mentioning them.
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Focuspuller
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« Reply #19 on: November 13, 2014, 08:34:24 AM »

I'm going to take Larry's word on this one.  I know we tested different thicknesses of the carbon steel, and there was no drop off in performance between 1/4" and anything thicker.

Stainless would be wickedly expensive and much more difficult to handle for our supplier.  Tougher to cut, more discolouration from the heat and so forth.  Cast in a flat disc would be a challenge to not develop inconsistencies as it cools, I think.

All fair points Shawn, thanks for mentioning them.

Another fact...Carbon Steel is use for Automotive Brake Disks because of there strength and heat shifting abilities.  Heats fast...cools quickly.
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« Reply #20 on: November 13, 2014, 08:37:19 AM »

Handling the rapid heating / cooling cycles would stress cast iron quite a bit, given the shape and the true surface required for a good 'flat-top' style griddle / grill.  Getting cast iron perfectly smooth is a challenge too, it's such a dirty process compared to working with steel.
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Vindii
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« Reply #21 on: November 13, 2014, 08:38:30 AM »

Another fact...Carbon Steel is use for Automotive Brake Disks because of there strength and heat shifting abilities.  Heats fast...cools quickly.


And maybe more so because its cheap!
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See post 18
http://smokinitforums.com/index.php?PHPSESSID=oovcf0ho0f6b61ce5v721lodo7&topic=4485.15

They are closed minded idiots (did I just say that?? YEP!) and they can't see the usefulness of other types of cookers.
SmallBBQr
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« Reply #22 on: November 13, 2014, 08:42:28 AM »

I currently have a baking steel (15") and yes, you would not want it to be CI.  The steel is indestructible.  It is also much more dense/heavy which I believe will translate to better heat retention/transfer (though I am no metal expert by any stretch).  EDIT:  Quick Google search seems to indicate carbon steel and cast iron seem to have very similar thermal characteristics.

After dozens of cooking cycles...it is still perfectly flat...no change in shape etc.

Agree on the stainless steel....cost a huge factor!  I am not sure how stainless compares to mild/carbon steel as a heat transfer surface.   EDIT:  Google search seems to indicate Stainless has very poor (compared to carbon/CI) thermal characteristics.

After numerous cooks, you can see my steel here.  It has a beautiful surface on it now.


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Kick Ash Divide & Conquer Kegger
Shawn W
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« Reply #23 on: November 13, 2014, 09:32:48 AM »

And maybe more so because its cheap!
ya, better markup
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Focuspuller
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No way...no how...


« Reply #24 on: November 13, 2014, 09:41:54 AM »

ya, better markup

The price offered is very fair.

Check prices of Brake Disk Rotors...same material, but smaller diameter.
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Vindii
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« Reply #25 on: November 13, 2014, 09:53:03 AM »

The price offered is very fair.

Check prices of Brake Disk Rotors...same material, but smaller diameter.

My comment was about the brake rotors not this baking steel.  I believe Shawn's was also.
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See post 18
http://smokinitforums.com/index.php?PHPSESSID=oovcf0ho0f6b61ce5v721lodo7&topic=4485.15

They are closed minded idiots (did I just say that?? YEP!) and they can't see the usefulness of other types of cookers.
Focuspuller
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No way...no how...


« Reply #26 on: November 13, 2014, 10:04:44 AM »

My comment was about the brake rotors not this baking steel.  I believe Shawn's was also.

Sorry missed that...did not see posting.
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SmallBBQr
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« Reply #27 on: November 13, 2014, 10:05:18 AM »

On the price, I sure wish this offer came up a while back...would have saved me some cash.

Keg Offer - $50 + $14.95 shipping.

Local metal shops...could not find anyone willing to cut me one for under $200 (there are a LOT of welding/fabricators around here, but the oil business has driven prices through the roof).

For my "Baking Steel", I paid $85 (US) plus around $30 shipping to get it here to Canada (www.bakingsteel.com).  The fabrication quality is elite on this - very niceley polished, slightly beveled edge  etc, but that doesn't really have much effect on the cook.


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Kick Ash Divide & Conquer Kegger
Shawn W
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« Reply #28 on: November 13, 2014, 10:06:15 AM »

The price offered is very fair.

didn't say it wasn't (that's Rich's offer too BTW, he didn't say that was retail price), but cheaper is better, if it's too expensive it won't sell. Those SS Kettle Q's are $110 at the BBQ Store here  Shocked.

Ya ss isn't as nice to cook on, my main complaint with it is stuff sticks, I personally wouldn't care about blue-ing (discoloration) but I could see that becoming a warranty nightmare

Is the carbon steel cheaper to make than a good cast iron? I don't know ... I'd hate to use the thing once then come back to it after a time and find it rusted like crazy but that's no different than CI, smooth well seasoned CI is a beautiful thing to cook on, but doesn't do well with high heat and loosing seasoning. Another advantage for CS.

I'm glad we had this little chat. Sign me up please, I'll take one

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SmallBBQr
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« Reply #29 on: November 13, 2014, 10:10:33 AM »

I'd hate to use the thing once then come back to it after a time and find it rusted like crazy but that's no different than CI, smooth well seasoned CI is a beautiful thing to cook on, but doesn't do well with high heat and loosing seasoning. Another advantage for CS.

So far, I have zero issues with any kind of rusting (as you can see from the above picture.  Mine often sits for days in the Keg after a cook and I have done almost nothing to maintain it...just the rare wipe now and then.  I haven't specifically seasoned it or anything.  That said, I rarely cook with it above 550-600.
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Kick Ash Divide & Conquer Kegger
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